Salt Fire & Time’s Broth Bar Introduces Summer Collagen Coolers

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Four fruit and collagen drinks for summer. From L-R, Melon Moon, Flame Tamer, Sweet Greens, and Beauty Lemonade.

Let’s hear it for tempting, refreshing summer drinks! And it’s a bonus when they’re good for you. Now, we have exactly that: enter, the Summer Collagen Cooler.

Earlier this week I stopped by Salt Fire & Time’s Broth Bar to sample their new Summer Collagen Coolers. These are raw, cold pressed juices combined with collagen peptides and a little soda water that results in a light and fizzy drink. While fresh raw juice is nourishing in its own right with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (plant chemicals), the addition of collagen amps up the nutrient density of the drink, making it greater than the sum of its parts. It is a good source of protein, aids joint health, helps with digestion, and also improves hair, skin, and nails. And the best part about these Collagen Coolers—they taste really good!

Salt Time & Fire’s proprietor, Tressa Yellig, spoke about how excited she is about these new drinks for summer, as well as how much she enjoys providing a range of nourishing foods to Portlanders. About the Collagen Coolers she points out,  “We produce less collagen as we age and supplementing with collagen-rich foods can make up the difference that our bodies need in delicious ways everyday by drinking bone broth or refreshing collagen coolers.” Continue reading “Salt Fire & Time’s Broth Bar Introduces Summer Collagen Coolers”

First Tastes: Flavors of Summer

Portland is full of mouthwatering food and I love to try dishes that are new or new-to-me. Here are some recent tastes and my first impressions of them.

Superfood Coleslaw | Dick’s Kitchen. If it’s not clear yet, it should be—I’m a big fan of coleslaw. The Dick’s version contained things like brussels sprouts, kale,  carrots, and red cabbage; it was light on the mayo and had a nice balance of natural sweetness and tang. The vegetables had softened a bit but were still crunchy, making it highly pleasant to eat. I’d get it again. Dick’s Kitchen NW, 704 NW 21st Avenue, Portland

Griddled Bread Pudding | Vivienne Kitchen & Pantry. This was my second visit to Vivienne, the previous (and initial) visit being November 2016, so it might as well have been my first time there. The Griddled Bread Pudding was a chalkboard special, and the staff basically swooned over it, so I decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did—the bread pudding was dense yet soft and at times had almost a mochi texture to it (disclosure: I love mochi). The variety of berries atop were lovely, and it was nice to have a mix rather than only the requisite strawberries; there was a dab of soft compound butter featuring an herb that might have been dill. It was accompanied by two sunny side up eggs with bright orange yolks and bacon that was deeply satisfying in its savory-saltiness. Vivienne Kitchen & Pantry, 4128 NE Sandy Blvd, Portland Continue reading “First Tastes: Flavors of Summer”

Asian-Style On My Mind

When I see an Oriental Chop Chop or a Secret Asian Man, I feel … weary. Because the language of the Asian salad is revealing of the dangers of bland, disembodied generalization: When you fail to see countries and cultures as discrete entities, what kind of consideration could you be expected to give to individual people?

–Bonnie Tsui, author of the essay, Why Is Asian Salad Still on the Menu?

The other night in Portland I ate a downright delicious thing called the Crispy Korean Fried Chicken Sandwich. Along with the pleasantly moist chicken with a crackly crust, the condiments hit all my favorite notes—creamy, tangy, savory, spicy—and the bun held the sandwich together without getting in the way of its filling. In the sandwich’s menu description there was a list of elements and they included, among other things, “Asian-style coleslaw.” What?  Continue reading “Asian-Style On My Mind”

I’m Volunteering at Feast Portland 2017

Last year when I moved to Portland, I came to know about Feast Portland embarrassingly (but understandably so) late in the game—pretty much all events were sold out by August, and I was still recovering from the intense move across the country, so attending was just too much to consider.

I’m pleased to say that I’ll be there this year, just not as an attendee—I’ll be a volunteer!

I’m pretty psyched, to say the least. I attended numerous food events as press over the years in NYC, and I saw how hard the volunteers and staff work to make each event a success. It’s my time to give back and be a volunteer myself. I think it’s going to be a great experience.

Farewell, Pono Soul Farm Kitchen

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One Kusshi oyster from Puget Sound, sitting atop a bed of rock salt studded with whole spices, accompanied by a ponzu mignonette, chives, and a microgreen. It was plump and meaty, and tasted almost sweet. My favorite oyster to date.

Pono Soul Farm Kitchen, I’ll miss you.

On June 23 I read the news that one of my neighborhood restaurants, Pono Soul Farm Kitchen, will close on July 8.  I’ve read three reports on the impending shuttering—from Eater, The Oregonian, and Portland Food and Drink—and none of them indicate the reasons why, not even a touch of speculation. Eater quotes part of the press release from co-owner Ted Nakato, who thanks his customers for their dining and support, but that’s about it. Personally, I wish we knew more.

If you’re unfamiliar with Pono Soul Farm Kitchen, it is a farm-to-table restaurant that primarily serves as a place to showcase Pono Farm’s meats—beef, pork, and eggs raised in Bend, OR. The offerings have been called “Japanese soul food”—dumplings, ramen, and hot pot, to name a few; their sushi is excellent, too. They source their produce from places like DeNoble Farms, Groundwork Organics, and Gathering Together Farm, among others. Menu changes semi-regularly. Continue reading “Farewell, Pono Soul Farm Kitchen”